Most Famous Castles and Palaces in Germany


  1. 1 Albrechtsburg, Meißen Castle

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    The Albrechtsburg is a Late Gothic castle situated in the town focal point of Meissen in the German territory of Saxony. It is arranged on a slope over the waterway Elbe, contiguous the Meissen Cathedral.

    In 929 King Henry I of Germany stifled the Slavic Glomacze clan at the Siege of Gana and manufactured a post within their settlement territory, arranged on a stone high over the Elbe river.[1] This castle, called Misnia after a close by rivulet, turned into the core of the town and from 965 the home of the Margraves of Meissen, who in 1423 procured the Electorate of Saxony.

    From 1464, Elector Ernest of Saxony managed jointly with his more youthful sibling Albert the Bold and both had the present-day castle based on 1471. Crafted by court manufacturer Arnold of Westphalia was developed exclusively as a habitation, not as a military stronghold (the primary German castle worked for such a reason). At the point when the siblings separated the Wettin lands by the 1485 Treaty of Leipzig, the castle of Meissen was given to Albert. Despite the fact that Albert's child Duke George the Bearded lived at the Albrechtsburg, it was before long supplanted by Dresden Castle as the new seat of the Wettin Albertinian line.

  2. 2 Augustusburg Palace, Brühl

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    The Augustusburg and Falkenlust Palaces structure a verifiable building complex in Brühl, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, which has been recorded as an UNESCO social World Heritage Site since 1984. The buildings are associated by the open gardens and trees of the Schlosspark. Augustusburg Palace (German: Schloss Augustusburg) and its parks likewise fill in as a setting for the Brühl Palace Concerts. The Max Ernst Museum is found close by.

    The palaces were worked toward the beginning of the eighteenth century by the Archbishop-Elector of Cologne, Clemens August of Bavaria of the Wittelsbach family. The draftsmen were Johann Conrad Schlaun and François de Cuvilliés. The main square of Augustusburg Palace is a U-formed building with three main stories and two degrees of upper rooms. The radiant staircase was structured by Johann Balthasar Neumann.

    The nurseries were planned by Dominique Girard. An intricate blossom garden for a region south of the palaces was likewise planned, however it was rebuilt by Peter Joseph Lenné in the nineteenth century and transformed into a landscape garden. Endeavors to revamp the territory have demonstrated troublesome, because of poor source material accessibility.

  3. 3 Mannheim Baroque Palace

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    Mannheim Palace (German: Mannheimer Schloss) is a huge Baroque palace in Mannheim, Baden-Württemberg, Germany. It was originally the main living arrangement of the Prince-voters of the Electorate of the Palatinate of the House of Wittelsbach. Some portion of the palace is utilized by the University of Mannheim. The castle, which highlights woven artworks, furniture, paintings, porcelain and flatware can be visited on a free-stream premise with audioguides.

    The city of Mannheim, established in 1606, was strengthened and at the current site of the castle there was a stronghold called Friedrichsburg, now and then serving as elective habitation for the Elector, one of the most significant regional princes of the Holy Roman Empire.

    The genuine palace dates from the eighteenth century. At the point when Elector Karl III Philip had confession booth discussions with the inhabitants of his capital Heidelberg, he chose to make Mannheim the Palatinate's new capital in 1720. Karl Philip chose to build another palace as his living arrangement on the site of the old Friedrichsburg. It was a piece of a general pattern among the German princes to make grand new homes in that time.

  4. 4 Benrath Palace, Dusseldorf

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    Schloss (Benrath Palace) is a Baroque-style maison de plaisance (joy palace) in Benrath, which is presently a district of Düsseldorf. It was raised for the Elector Palatine Charles Theodor and his significant other, Countess Palatine Elisabeth Auguste of Sulzbach, by his nursery and building executive Nicolas de Pigage. Development started in 1755 and was finished in 1770. The outfit at Benrath has been proposed for assignment as an UNESCO World Heritage Site.

    The main building, the focal corps de logis, for the Elector Palatine and his better half is flanked by two angled even wings, the maisons de cavalière, which originally housed the workers. They halfway encompass a round lake, the Schlossweiher (palace lake), in the north. On the southside lies a long rectangular lake, the Spiegelweiher (reflect lake). From the predescant castle, which stood some time ago in the mid of the long rectangular lake on the southside of the palace, is preserved just one of the worker wings, the purported Alte Orangerie (Old Orangery).

  5. 5 Burg Altena, Soest

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    Altena Castle (German: Burg Altena) is a medieval slope castle in the town of Altena in North Rhine-Westphalia. Based on a prod of Klusenberg slope, the castle lies close to the Lenne in the Märkischer Kreis.

    The castle was raised by the early Counts of Berg in the mid twelfth century.[1] Eventually, the House of Berg abandoned Altena and moved their habitation to Hamm.

    Apparently, the castle was worked by the siblings Adolf and Everhard von Berg around the year 1108 after Henry V conceded them land in Sauerland for their dependable administrations. On Wulfseck Mountain they assembled their castle, which they named Wulfeshagen, later Altena. This is one of the few legends of the foundation of the region of Altena and the building of the castle.

  6. 6 Burg Eltz, Wierschem

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    Eltz Castle (German: Burg Eltz) is a medieval castle settled in the slopes over the Moselle River among Koblenz and Trier, Germany. It is as yet claimed by a part of a similar family (the Eltz family) that lived there in the twelfth century, 33 ages back. Bürresheim Castle, Eltz Castle and Lissingen Castle are the main castles on the left bank of the Rhine in Rhineland-Palatinate which have never been pulverized.

    The castle is encompassed on three sides by the Elzbach River, a tributary on the north side of the Moselle. It is on a 70-meter (230 ft) rock spike, on a significant Roman exchange course between rich farmlands and their business sectors. The Eltz Forest has been proclaimed a nature hold by Flora-Fauna-Habitat and Natura 2000.

  7. 7 Burg Reichenstein, Germany

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    Reichenstein Castle (German: Burg Reichenstein), otherwise called Falkenburg is a castle in the UNESCO World Heritage Site of the Upper Middle Rhine Valley. It stands on a mountain prod on the eastern incline of the Bingen Forest, over the Rhineland-Palatinate region of Trechtingshausen in the Mainz-Bingen locale in Germany.

    The primary notice of the castle happens in 1213, when Philipp III von Bolanden was appointed "castellanus" and bailiff by the Kornelimünster Abbey at Aachen. Its implied catch in 1253 remains a subject of discussion among specialists, however there is no uncertainty that King Rudolph I of Habsburg blockaded, caught, and obliterated the castle in 1282. At that point, Reichenstein was in the hands of wild looter knights drove by Dietrich von Hohenfels. Following its annihilation, King Rudolph preclude the castle from being revamped, and according to legend, had Dietrich and his adherents decapitated close to Saint Clement's Chapel (Clemenskapelle). In truth, it appears that, while his adherents were dangled from trees, Dietrich himself got away.

  8. 8 Burg Rheinfels Castle

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    Rheinfels Castle (German: Burg Rheinfels) is a castle ruin situated over the left (west) bank of the Rhine in Sankt Goar, Germany. It was begun in 1245 by Count Diether V of Katzenelnbogen. After developments, it was the biggest fortification in the Middle Rhein Valley among Koblenz and Mainz. It was insulted by French Revolutionary Army troops in 1797. It is the biggest castle overlooking the Rhine, and generally secured multiple times its present region.

    While a significant part of the castle is a ruin, a portion of the external buildings are presently a lavish lodging, "wellbeing" focus and restaurant.[citation needed] There is additionally a historical center within a portion of the better protected structures.

  9. 9 Burg Rheinstein, Castle, Germany

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    The castle was developed in around 1316/1317. Rheinstein Castle was significant for its key area. By 1344, the castle was in decline. When of the Palatine War of Succession, the castle was frail. During the sentimental period in the nineteenth century, Prince Frederick of Prussia (1794–1863) purchased the castle and it was revamped.

    Burg Rheinstein has a working drawbridge and portcullis, which are run of the mill of medieval castle engineering and guards. The castle is available to the general population. Simply past the blessing shop close to the passage is an opening on the left to the yard, which has perspectives on the Rhine. Rheinstein's patio is known as the Burgundy Garden after the Burgundy grape vine growing there. The vine, which is around 500 years of age, despite everything produces grapes.

  10. 10 Burg Trifels Castle

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    Trifels Castle (German: Reichsburg Trifels) is a reproduced medieval castle at a rise of 500 m (1,600 ft) close to the unassuming community of Annweiler, in the Palatinate locale of southwestern Germany. It is found high over the Queich valley within the Palatinate Forest on one pinnacle of a red sandstone mountain split into three.[1] Trifels Castle is on the pinnacle of the Sonnenberg, and on both of the other two stone heights there are castle ruins: Anebos Castle and Scharfenberg Castle (demotically called Münz).

    Trifels Castle has been step by step reestablished since the nineteenth century and today copies of the Imperial Regalia (Reichskleinodien) of the Holy Roman Empire are in plain view here. It is—as one with Hambach Castle—one of the most famous visitor destinations in the territory of Rhineland-Palatinate.

  11. 11 Burg Vischering Castle

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    Vischering Castle (German: Burg Vischering) in Lüdinghausen, North Rhine-Westphalia is the most run of the mill moated castle in the Münster locale of Germany. This locale has one of the most noteworthy German convergences of castles, palaces and fortresses, Lüdinghausen having three without anyone else. The castle comprises of external guarded yard, cautious passages, channel, drawbridge, main building and house of prayer. The sandstone dividers, the red tile rooftops just as their appearance in the channel give numerous agreeable perspectives from the lush surroundings.

    Vischering Castle was worked by Bischop Gerhard von der Mark to counter the subsequent castle worked by the Von Lüdinghausen family. It turned into the seat of the Droste zu Vischering Family. Droste is the nearby title for the inherited honorable administrators serving the Bishops of Münster. The canal is continually recharged by a side-arm of the River Stever. The external cautious yard contains the business and ranch buildings. The main building is a horseshoe-formed three-story structure with substantial external divider. Its inner yard is cut off by the house of prayer and a lower safeguard divider. A castle keep is missing, having been evacuated during Renaissance remodels.

  12. 12 Colditz Castle, Saxony, Germany

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    Castle Colditz (or Schloss Colditz in German) is a Renaissance castle in the town of Colditz close to Leipzig, Dresden and Chemnitz in the territory of Saxony in Germany. The castle is between the towns of Hartha and Grimma on a slope spike over the stream Zwickauer Mulde, a tributary of the River Elbe. It had the main untamed life park in Germany while, during 1523, the castle park was changed over into perhaps the biggest zoo in Europe. The castle gained international notoriety as the site of Oflag IV-C, a captive camp during World War II for "incorrigible" Allied officials who had more than once got away from different camps.

    In 1046, Henry III of the Holy Roman Empire gave the burghers of Colditz authorization to construct the main recorded settlement at the site. During 1083, Henry IV encouraged Margrave Wiprecht of Groitzsch to build up the castle site, which Colditz acknowledged. During 1158, Emperor Frederick Barbarossa made Thimo I "Ruler of Colditz", and significant building works started. By 1200, the town around the market was set up. Timberlands, void knolls, and farmland were settled beside the previous Slavic towns Zschetzsch, Zschadraß, Zollwitz, Terpitzsch and Koltzschen. Around that time the bigger towns Hohnbach, Thierbaum, Ebersbach and Tautenhain additionally created.

  13. 13 Dornburger Schlösser

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    Das Ensemble der drei Dornburger Schlösser liegt am Rand eines Muschelkalkfelsenplateaus über der Saale in Dornburg-Camburg, nördlich von Jena im Bundesland Thüringen. Seit dem 12. Dezember 2008 befinden sich alle drei Schlösser im Eigentum der Stiftung Thüringer Schlösser und Gärten.

    Pass on Flur Dornburgs ist, was archäologische Funde belegen, seit der jüngeren Steinzeit kontinuierlich besiedelt. Bekannteste Funde sind das Hügelgrab am Steinbruch und der Bronzesichel-Fund auf dem Wetthügel. Aber auch vielzählige Funde aus der Eisenzeit und der Völkerwanderungszeit bis hin zur slawischen Besiedlung lassen eine intensive Nutzung vermuten.

  14. 14 Ehrenburg Palace, Coburg

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    Ehrenburg Palace (German: Schloss Ehrenburg) is a palace in Coburg, Franconia, Germany. It filled in as the main Coburg living arrangement for the ruling princes from the 1540s until 1918. The palace's outside today mostly reflects Gothic Revival style.

    The palace was worked by Johann Ernst, Duke of Saxe-Coburg, in 1543-7. It supplanted the Veste Coburg as the dukes' town Residenz. The new town palace was worked around a Franciscan religious community broke up during Reformation. According to convention, the palace was named Ehrenburg ("Palace of Honor") by Emperor Charles V for having been developed without the utilization of constrained work.

  15. 15 Granitz Hunting Lodge, Binz

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    Granitz Hunting Lodge (German: Jagdschloss Granitz) is situated on the German island of Rügen in the vicinity of the coastline resort of Binz. With more than 200,000 guests for each year it is the most mainstream castle or schloss in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern.

    The lodge lies in the forested Granitz edge, which covers a region of around 1,000 hectares (2,500 sections of land) and has been a piece of the Southeast Rügen Biosphere Reserve since 1991. The name Tempelberg given to the most noteworthy slope in the Granitz originates from the eighteenth century, when a little hexagonal belvedere remained on the site of the present schloss. The speediest method to arrive is from the Baltic shoreline resort of Binz on the Rügen Light Railway or the Hunting Lodge Express (Jagdschlossexpress).


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